DISCS & ZEN – MAKE ROOM IN YOUR BAG FOR THE USEFUL

This photo comes from @lizardee on Instagram

This photo comes from @lizardee on Instagram

In Zen & The Art Of Disc Golf, I talked at great length about how your disc golf bag can be seen as a metaphor for all the baggage that you carry around with you from day to day and how if you do not place your bag on the ground (“dropping your baggage”) you severely decrease your accuracy and ability to achieve your goals.

Today, I would like to talk to you about what we place in our bags and how we hold onto discs and equipment that serve no other purpose than to “fill out our bags.” It’s very interesting to meet and talk to so many new players who begin playing disc golf and starting with the same habits. I believe a psychologist could make a reasonable study of disc golfers to extrapolate trends in human behavior. We often talk about how newer players tend to buy high speed drivers in hopes that the numbers on the disc alone will put our tee shots where we want them in the fairway with little attention paid to our throwing technique, but another habit that we have is being pack rats or maybe “bag rats” would be a better term.

It typically begins like this: A new player begins with 1-3 discs, in their minds, not enough to buy a huge bag and fill it out with unnecessary equipment. As a matter of fact, a newer player may look at other “big bag disc golfers” and scoff to themselves, seeing no point in carrying so many discs. Then this player tries out one or two of his friends discs and again mistakes a good throw for a good disc. Now, he heads to the store to buy those discs – and maybe 1 or 2 more while he is there, now he has 6 or 7 discs. He/she can’t carry that many discs comfortably on the course in their hands and heads back to shop for a new bag, and feels they may as well get a bag they can grow into, so they buy a 10-12 disc bag, and maybe 1 or 2 more discs. Now they own a 12 disc bag and 8 or 9 discs that are banging around in the bag when they walk on the course, so they need to fill it out with a few more discs. Before they know it they have bought enough discs to fill a bag instead of ones they actually plan to throw. They continue to throw just a few discs from the bag but continue to carry a plethora of extra weight. Extra weight is great for burning calories and looking cool but bears no correlation to how well you play. In fact by hole 18 you might be 20% more tired from bearing extra weight you never used during your game.

Now, there is nothing wrong with carrying a full bag of discs. There are two schools of thought when it comes to bag size. The first school is learn how to shot shape a few staple discs and the second is have a disc for every job and to know those discs. Neither is wrong, but speaking purely metaphorically how often do we carry unnecessary discs that don’t serve our game and are mainly souvenirs from the disc golf store? And similarly how often do we carry negative thoughts, feelings, and emotions around with us on a daily basis that don’t serve us in the game of life, and wear them as if they are badges of experience.

Every emotion that we have has evolved within the human experience to some extent as a way to aid us in recognizing imminent threat or bodily harm.Emotions generally remov the concept of rationality in attempt to simplify our mental processes, in other words if we had to constantly scan and rationalize every experience we have as being helpful or harmful it would be exhausting, so emotions take away some of that mental processing and put our bodies in states that allow us to survive without constantly scanning whether or not an experience is good or bad. Emotions take on some of the work and they help prior experiences stick in memory so if we have similar experience to one in past that was previously harmful we may begin to feel what we felt during that harmful experience without the brain having to work to rationalize that this is an entirely new experience.

For example, one major feeling or emotion that I want to touch on is worry, because worry is generally experienced in much longer periods than some other emotions and as a result loses much of its rationality because it doesn’t serve to protect us against some imminent harm. And isn’t it true that most of the things we worry deeply about never occur the way we worried they might?

Worry is negative visualization. It is praying for what you don’t want to happen.

So if you step up on the tee box and worry about hitting that tree you seem to always hit, you may just hit that tree. Especially if you announce to your group that you probably will hit that tree because now you have made a verbal plan to hit that tree.

If you refuse to play in that tournament you have been thinking about playing because you are worrying how you will feel when you hit that tree with everyone looking – the worry you feel in that moment is visualization of that happening, and because your brain can tell little difference between reality and your visualization of reality – the worry the you feel is just as bad as the embarrassment you think you might feel, and the worst part is you never even had to hit the tree in a real tournament to feel embarrassed. In other words the worry is worse than the embarrassment!

Some people wear their negative emotions and feelings as a badge, like a souvenir for their misgivings. In the case of worry, some people like to reframe their worry as caring. For example they worry about you and call it caring about you. But the worry only serves to only see bad outcomes for other people – now I ask you, is seeing only bad outcomes for other people really caring for them or is it discouraging them from reaching for their goals? Some people wear the badge of anger and carry it as a souvenir for their misgivings and bad experiences. They will qualify it as a means of self-protection, but really it only harms themselves by not letting the good that life has to offer in. It often keeps the good away – good feelings, good experiences, and good people. They may think its protection but really, to the outside world, it’s victimization – believing they have something to always be angry about makes the assumption that they will forever be a victim. Some people carry the badge of sadness, as a souvenir for their misgivings and bad experiences. These people have resolved to never be happy because the world is a cruel and awful place. What they really want if for someone to feel sorry for them. Asking another person to feel bad with you is one of the most selfish things you could ask for.

Once again, emotions have their place. They warn us of imminent danger or threat but once the danger or threat is removed, they are to be recovered from. Holding onto emotions past the point of recovery is similar to hanging onto discs that you don’t need to carry because they “fill out your bag.” Every once and a while, you should open up your disc golf bag and see what extra weight you are carrying remove it like you would weed a garden. Still can’t throw that Nuke, Viper, or Spirit? Why weigh yourself down with discs you don’t need? Create room in your bag for an extra Valkyrie, Stalker, or Lace. Do the same with your mind:

Where worry lives, there’s no room for contentment. Where anger lives, there’s no room for forgiveness. Where sadness lives, there’s no room for gratitude.

This is not to underestimate the tragedies that we find ourselves in from day to day. As I mentioned above, emotions help us deal with negative situations that are often times not preventable, however humans were not designed to live with long term sustained negative thoughts, feelings, and emotions. When we sustain these feelings it actually does physical harm to our bodies, makes us ill, and as I mentioned above keeps the good stuff away. Disc golf has helped lead thousands of people through bad times as a way to reflect and find focus in a world where sometimes coping takes all the energy you can muster, but for many this may not be enough. We all need help from time to time being the best possible versions of ourselves and we need mentors and coaches we can return to help us progress. For some people that might be friends or family and for others, doctors and counselors. The first step is recognizing that you are carrying a badge or souvenir from long ago and that life would be much better if you were somehow able to just let go.

Just because you were handed a bunch of negativity many moons ago doesn’t mean your still required to carry it everywhere you go.

And that’s another tool for your Disc Golf bag.

Patrick McCormick

This blog originally appeared in ZDGP EP26.

PODCAST EP#25 – Yoga & The Art Of Disc Golf (With Megan Nance and Garin Wootton)

ZEN DISC GOLF EP25c

Subscribe on iTunes | Listen on StitcherDownload Podcast Audio

Episode #25 – Yoga & The Art Of Disc Golf (With Megan Nance and Garin Wootton)

 

Todays podcast is brought to you by some of our amazing and generous podcast contributors:

Kevin Kugler – Wisconsin
Adam Kubiak – Pennsylvania
Adam Gowland – Ontario, Canada
Jørn Idar Kvig – Oslo, Norway
Christoffer Pettersen – Kristiansand, Norway

DISCS & ZEN – FROM THE DISCS PERSPECTIVE

I was playing a doubles round with some friends of mine the other day when we got to hole number 8 at Newport News disc golf course and I had a new revelation.

Most of  this group are players I have recently introduced to the game and even though they had played the course several times from the short tees had never played from the long tees. We decided to try the long tees for some added variation and also decided that doubles would be a good starting point for playing a slightly longer course.

We paired up stronger players with weaker players to ensure some balance in the game and everyone was playing extremely well. I fully believe that switching up the tees, baskets, or even the course is a great way to step outside of the box and really see what you can do. For some reason, forcing yourself outside of routine seems to help you break out of complacency and help to influence the mindfulness and focus that disc golfers need to play well.

READ MORE

YOGA & THE ART OF DISC GOLF

Disc Golf Yoga – Pre-round warmup from Youngblood Productions on Vimeo.

MEGAN NANCE

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Megan Nance is a health and fitness coach, helping people start their fitness journeys and providing the tools to be successful. Using an online platform, she helps people find fitness and nutrition programs that will work for their lifestyle, and connects them with support and accountability. Megan is a  certified yoga teacher and has a passion for sharing the physical and mental benefits of yoga with others.  Her husband has shared his love of disc golf with her and as a certified yoga instructor, has developed a customized yoga practice for disc golfers. She lives with her husband and daughter in Austin, TX.

GARIN WOOTTEN

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“I have been playing disc golf since the early 1990s.  I played throughout college and post college.  I fell in love with sport and would play as much as I could back in the day.  Now I’ve got 3 kids and work quite a bit so finding time to play is not as easy.  I used to play many tournaments every year, but now I may pick 3 or 4 events each year.  I don’t play many courses even casually due to time constraints, but will still do field work and putt in my backyard to keep my skill set sharpened.  I have grown to really love field work, especially once I got into yoga. Yoga helps physically, but my mental focus is undeniably better with yoga training.  This can be said on and off the course.

Since I still wanted to be involved and even give back to a sport that I loved playing, I started a company called Black Zombie disc golf in 2013.  It was easier to work on my laptop and develop all these ideas to ‘color’ the sport I love.  I instantly had aspirations to be BZ of DG  much like Op was to surfing.  I have never surfed in my life, but i’ve had Op wallets, shirts, shorts, and more.  I look back at Op and they were able to capture the spirit of the ocean waves.  I wanted to capture the spirit of the outdoors as it applies to disc golf.  The image of intensity and accomplishment via the flight of a disc driven by a player.  Black Zombie has been nicknamed BZ for obvious reasons, but more importantly the idea of being ‘busy’ outside is my focus.  I try to motivate people to get off couch and get outside and what better vehicle than disc golf.  I think disc golf was lacking, and still lacking more brands that inspire people outside of disc golf to take another look all while keeping disc golfers excited and engaged through cool graphics and positive energy.

BZ has gotten very popular and the idea we are the disc golf infection has totally been embraced.  As us disc golfers know, disc golf is a sport that is infectious as we begin to play more and understand the flight of the disc against the elements.

I have been doing yoga for over 10yrs myself.  I really stepped up my yoga when my mother was diagnosed with cancer.  To counter my stress levels I was able to increase my yoga in reflection to my stress.  I whole heartedly feel that yoga was the best ‘medicine’ during this time before  my mother passed from the cancer treatments.  Cancer treatments and their effects on the elderly is a whole other soap box i’ve gotten on, but that is for another discussion.  Between the FDA, big pharma, and the profit digging on our elders is disgusting.  But, that was my stress and yoga was an amazing natural remedy.

For BZ, we are an apparel line first, but have designed our first putter with Gateway Disc Sports.  It was a 4month process last year and our putter, the Chainsaw, was approved January 2016.  You can add our website www.blackzombie.com so you or others can check out what we have to offer.  We launched our website recently and are still adding march we have.”

-GARIN WOOTTEN

PRODUCT REVIEWS

GARIN – Chainsaw Putter

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MEGAN – http://www.megnancehealthandfitness.com

CHRIS – QUEST TURBO PUTTER

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TIM – INFINITE DISCS APP

PAT – INFINITE DISCS LARGE BAG

thumb2_ab8b3247-b347-44a2-9b0c-39e048452dadLarge-Red.thumb

The Infinite Discs Large Disc Golf Bag is the perfect bag for disc golfers who have a lot of discs, and like to carry around some accessories with them, but don’t want to spend a fortune. This bag is made with premium 1680D fabric and quality YKK zippers.

Bag Features

  • Holds 18 – 22 Discs
  • Easy Access Putter Pocket that holds 2 discs
  • Large storage pockets on both sides
  • 2 large water bottle holders
  • Scorecard Pocket
  • Mini Pocket
  • Small Accessory Pocket
  • 3 Pencil Holders
  • Scorecard Pocket
  • Compatible with all major backpack style bag straps.

 

PODCAST GIVEWAWAY

Every podcast we give away an item to a random person who has left a 5 STAR review on Amazon or iTunes! 

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VIBRAM – ONYX

on April 21, 2016
I have nothing but glorious praise for this book. I personally have the audio book and have purchased a copy for my brother. This is something that any one into the disc golf scene must read. It not only helped me on the course but off as well. I am the unfortunate bearer of a short fuse, and it can be a problem. The teachings in this book have gotten me to lengthen that fuse and even eliminate things that would otherwise light it. This holds true on the course as well as off as I find myself consciously calming myself whenever the need arises. If I had a physical copy of this book, it would be filled with highlights and dog ears with the amount of times that I have revisited chapters just to reaffirm the lessons. Combined with the podcast, Patrick McCormick has created a zen philosophy that I can understand and bring into my life.

JOIN MIND BODY DISC IN DONATING TO  ST. JUDE!

events.stjude.org/mindbodydisc

Every little bit counts, please give what you can. Together we can make a difference.

Remember, kids are the future of our sport. And for many kids, St. Jude is the key to their future.

How your donation helps:

  • Thanks to donors like you, no family ever pays St. Jude for anything.
  • St. Jude will continue to improve the treatment of childhood cancer and other deadly diseases through its groundbreaking research.

HELP US KEEP GOING AND GROWING!

Funny thing about podcasting… Success costs money. As we continue to reach record numbers of listeners the costs rise with syndication, web development, and GIVEAWAYS, I am constantly plagued with the question, how can I keep the podcast self-sustaining.

The answer: $1. That’s it.

If you love the ZEN DISC GOLF PODCAST, please consider donating as little as $1 a month and help keep this show alive, going and growing.

BUT WAIT THERE’S MORE!

By supporting, you will be entered to win a $20 gift card from Infinite Discs. You will get one entry per donated dollar per month (i.e. Putter level =1 entry per month, Distance driver level = 3 entries per month). Cancel anytime!

Unknown$1 per month – Putter Level Unknown $2 per month – Mid-range LevelUnknown $3 per month – Distance Driver Level

DISCS & ZEN – FROM THE DISC’S PERSPECTIVE

Image by @holydiscgolfclub on instagram.

Image by @holydiscgolfclub on instagram.

I was playing a doubles round at Newport News Disc Golf Course the other day with some friends of mine when I suddenly I had a new revelation.

Most of  this group are players I have recently introduced to the game and even though they had played the course several times from the short tees, they had never played from the long tees. We decided to try the long tees for some added variation and also decided that doubles would be a good starting point for playing a slightly longer course.

We paired up stronger players with weaker players to ensure some balance in the game and everyone was playing extremely well. I fully believe that switching up the tees, baskets, or even the course is a great way to step outside of the box and really see what you can do. For some reason, forcing yourself outside of routine seems to help you break out of complacency and help to influence the mindfulness and focus that disc golfers need to play well.

When we stepped onto the long tee on hole 8, everyone looked stumped. For the first time they encountered a tee box with no real clear line to the basket, just jail bars of trees and limbs. I watched as their confidence broke and my friends resigned themselves to double bogeys on the hole before ever driving off the tee. Then I stepped up to the box and launched a right hand back hand throw. The disc threaded through the trees and made a line closing in on the basket when all the sudden it hit a tree and ricocheted hard left into what appeared to be the thickest part of the woods and almost ended up on another hole. Everyone immediately laughed with me as they imagined how bad my current lie must had become after the ricochet.

My partner got ready to step up to the tee box and asked me “What should I do? Should I play it safe and just try to thread it though and get it in the open?” I replied telling him that sounded like a good idea. He step up on the box and gave a nice soft toss and landed the disc in the open about 75 feet ahead. The shot was not far but it was safe. Everyone congratulated him on the throw and the group began to push forward. “I guess we will be using my shot!” he said, believing he was stating the obvious. I answered him “Maybe. Let’s see.” He laughed believing I must be joking. We both walked up to his disc and noticed that while he was in the open, we still had about 125 feet to travel and that there were trees surrounding the basket that might pose a problem. He got ready to put his mini down when I said “Wait a minute, lets see if mine is any better.” He said “You must be joking!” looking at me like I had horns coming out of the sides of  my head. “Just hold on!” I replied laughing and headed toward my disc which had cut hard left and laid in what appeared to be the thickest part of the woods.

When I got to my disc, much to my surprise, I realized that my lie was not bad at all. As a matter of fact I had a clear 30 or so foot shot at the basket. What I thought was my worst drive ever on this hole turned out the probably be one of the best. I yelled back “Let’s go with mine.” Again, my partner swore I had to be joking with him. He headed my way leaving his bag and disc behind, swearing his disc had to have the better line. When he got to my disc, he looked at the clearing to the basket and simply said “Whoa. Great shot!” He returned to his  bag, picked it up and headed back to my disc in the woods. Together we birdied the hole.

The moral of the story is you can’t always judge a shot from the tee box. You must see the shot from your disc’s perspective before you can make any judgements about your lie.

After throwing my disc from the tee, and watching its beautiful flight being knocked off it’s line, I could have gotten mad, kicked my bag, and cursed at the tree for disrupting my flight, but I didn’t. I have seen many times in this game what appears to be a bad shot from the box might just become one of the best shots you’ve ever made because winning isn’t always about relying on your perspective on the tee. It is about taking each shot as it goes and seeing each shot from the discs perspective.

In life we believe we make judgements solely based on our 5 senses: touch, taste, smell, hear, and see. In fact, our actual judgements using our sense input are then run through a filter of our experience and what we have learned in the past:

Beginning with my senses:
I watched my disc having a beautiful flight.
I saw it hit a tree.

Filtering through my past experiences:
In the past hitting trees has been bad for my game

Final judgement:
This shot went bad. I probably have a bad lie.

While our senses are the only way we can receive information, our final judgements may not necessarily reflect the actual situations in our lives. With our eyes we may not see clearly. With our ears we may not hear acutely. My hands are cold I may not be able to feel something perfectly. Our senses are never perfect, yet they form the basis of our understanding of the world. Then they get even more messed up as we filter them through experiences that have nothing to do with our current situation. This leads to so many misunderstandings in our lives and when we must make a judgement or decision based on this, it may be clouded and downright irrational.

So what is the solution?

One word: understanding.

Understanding means knowing that you don’t always have perfect information. That none of us are perfect in general. That just because you see something is wrong, doesn’t mean another person does. Understanding means coming to terms with our own imperfections and imperfections of those around us by stepping off of our personal tee pads and into the perspective of the disc or another person. And it means compassion and forgiveness for ourselves and others.

Don’t be so hard on yourself when things aren’t seeming to go your way. When you lock yourself in your own perspective, you may not see how great you are doing, how far you have come, and how close you are to achieving what you want.

 

This blog originally appeared in ZDGP EP25.

ZDGP24 – Contemplating Nothing (But Disc Golf) With David Mawr

Subscribe on iTunes | Listen on StitcherDownload Podcast Audio

Episode #24 – Contemplating Nothing (But Disc Golf) With David Mawr

Todays podcast is brought to you by some of our amazing and generous podcast contributors:

Joel Bautista
Sam Dickinson
Seth Jensen
Benjamin Wonders
Roger Crain

DISCS & ZEN

In Zen & The Art Of Disc Golf, I coined a simple phrase that we also end every podcast with which is “Most Importantly, Just Throw,” but I have never really delved into attempting to describe what I mean when I say this, mostly because I want it to mean what you need it to mean. Whatever the meaning you need to derive from it in the moment you are in.

In some instances it could mean simply – Just get out and play! Stop reading about it, stop listening to us talk about it! Just get out there and play. Of course, selfishly, it is not my wish that you disconnect from the podcast or my writing entirely but that chances are if you are reading or listening then you love this game and the hardest part of playing disc golf for most people is to simply drop what you are doing and play disc golf! Now, of course most of us can’t play disc golf all day and night, at work, while driving a car or riding on an airplane, so reading books, blogs, and listening to podcasts is a close substitution because through media it connects you to other like minded players out there at least mentally. But reading, listening to podcasts, and watching youtube videos about becoming a better player will never be a substitute for playing the game.

READ MORE 

DAVID MAWR

David Mawr is a former school teacher and newer to the game of disc golf, but his love for the game as already grown into an addiction that has led he and his wife on a journey to sell all their things and backpack Colorado and Kansas, playing every course and tournament he can along the way. His effort is partially to meet and learn from as many people as he can but also help get disc golf into local schools. He will be documenting his trip on his blog and through his YouTube channel.

David, sounds like one of our long lost brothers and was a perfect fit for the cast. During the episode he opens up about some of his own adversities that he feels disc golf has become the perfect medicine for.

David mentions the following links in our interview

DGnomad – Portable Disc Golf Targets

David’s Go Fund Me – Disc Golf In School

Steve Harvery – Jumping To Success

PRODUCT REVIEWS

TIM – DIRT BAG BY DYNAMIC DISCS
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DAVID – FRICTION GLOVES

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CHRIS – NITE IZE LED DISCS
thumb2_f99e68a0-7115-4697-b954-0dd2210efcbcDSC05766.thumb

PAT – WESTSIDE SEER
thumb2_e9304f23-4e24-4a48-975f-6b1a1e5bea45WestsideSeer.thumb

PODCAST GIVEWAWAY

Every podcast we give away an item to a random person who has left a 5 STAR review on Amazon or iTunes!

 

GIFTCARD GIVEWAWAY

Every month we give away a $20 gift card to one of our amazing podcast contributors.

This month’s gift card goes to Dustin DeMatteo!

JOIN MIND BODY DISC IN DONATING TO  ST. JUDE!

events.stjude.org/mindbodydisc

Every little bit counts, please give what you can. Together we can make a difference.

Remember, kids are the future of our sport. And for many kids, St. Jude is the key to their future.

How your donation helps:

  • Thanks to donors like you, no family ever pays St. Jude for anything.
  • St. Jude will continue to improve the treatment of childhood cancer and other deadly diseases through its groundbreaking research.

 

HELP US KEEP GOING AND GROWING!

Funny thing about podcasting… Success costs money. As we continue to reach record numbers of listeners the costs rise with syndication, web development, and GIVEAWAYS, I am constantly plagued with the question, how can I keep the podcast self-sustaining.

The answer: $1. That’s it.

If you love the ZEN DISC GOLF PODCAST, please consider donating as little as $1 a month and help keep this show alive, going and growing.

BUT WAIT THERE’S MORE!

By supporting, you will be entered to win a $20 gift card from Infinite Discs. You will get one entry per donated dollar per month (i.e. Putter level =1 entry per month, Distance driver level = 3 entries per month). Cancel anytime!

Unknown$1 per month – Putter Level Unknown $2 per month – Mid-range LevelUnknown $3 per month – Distance Driver Level

DISCS & ZEN – Release And Move Forward

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Image from @zmansnada on IG

In Zen & The Art Of Disc Golf, I coined a simple phrase that we also end every podcast with which is “Most Importantly, Just Throw,” but I have never really delved into attempting to describe what I mean when I say this, mostly because I want it to mean what you need it to mean. Whatever the meaning you need to derive from it in the moment you are in.

In some instances it could mean simply – Just get out and play! Stop reading about it, stop listening to us talk about it! Just get out there and play. Of course, selfishly, it is not my wish that you disconnect from the podcast or my writing entirely but that chances are if you are reading or listening then you love this game and the hardest part of playing disc golf for most people is to simply drop what you are doing and play disc golf! Now, of course most of us can’t play disc golf all day and night, at work, while driving a car or riding on an airplane, so reading books, blogs, and listening to podcasts is a close substitution because through media it connects you to other like minded players out there at least mentally. But reading, listening to podcasts, and watching youtube videos about becoming a better player will never be a substitute for playing the game.

In other instances, when used on the course, the phrase “Just throw,” could have a more meditative meaning, such as forget everything else and focus on throwing. Drop your baggage, quiet your inner critic, visualize your shot, and simply pull back and release.

I want to add a third meaning, however, the process of throwing involves that release. We could rephrase “Just throw” with “Just let go.” To some this may sound cliche, to others profound, to me sometimes the most profound concepts are found in the simplest ideas. You can’t play disc golf without throwing or without letting go.

Simple enough concept, right? You pull back, release, and move forward. You may have good lies, you may have bad ones but at least you move forward. One of my favorite sayings for someone who throws and lands in a bad place is: “You can see it from there,” referring to the basket. It’s meant as a joke, but it’s true – you got closer to your goal and you can still see it. It may not have been an ace and it might sound a little overboard on the positive thinking boat, but seriously – if you are moving forward and having fun, does it matter? “You can still see it from there.”

The game of disc golf is to release and move forward.

You must release, you must let go, you must throw to play them game. Only you can control whether or not you are having fun. Sometimes that takes reframing your situation.

A friend of mine on the course the other day had a couple of bad holes and as a result his score was falling behind.  He began complaining about his round and someone in the group stated: “At least you’re having fun!” and he quickly  responded “I’m losing. I don’t have fun when I lose!”

What a statement! That is high standard he places on his happiness, isn’t it? On that day there were 4 of us playing which meant he had a 1 in 4 chance in having fun based on his standard, not to mention all of the other elements outside of his control, wind, weather, course condition, heat, level of practice, level of energy, ability to focus, all elements that help you win.

My standard for happiness on the course is being outside with the company of people I enjoy, playing a game I love and because this happens every round, as long as I remember this is my standard for happiness, I have fun every round. I will never say winning isn’t important, we should strive to win, but our positive emotions should not be based on a standard left so highly to chance.

In life we set our own standards and expectations everyday. Unfortunately when we set our standards and exceptions high and base them on factors we can’t control we allow our emotions to be controlled by chance, but if we are able to take a step back and reframe our standards and expectations for happiness, we have a much better chance of becoming content and truly happy. You’ll notice my standard for playing revolves closely around being grateful to being able to be outdoors, being grateful to have good company, and being grateful that I have the time and health to play such a truly fun game.

We can all use this outlook on life to a greater extent. Look around you right now, all you have – people, things, your environment are a product of the actions you took to get them. Hopefully it was all stuff that you wanted at sometime and you got it. Dissatisfaction occurs when you place to much emphasis on what you don’t have or what you can’t control, but you can change that. You create your own standard for happiness, contentment, and fun. It is up to you to find them, reflect on them, and enjoy this life!

No get out there and play this game you love and JUST THROW!

PODCAST EP#23 – How We Will Grow The Sport (W/ John Heaton – Event Chair St. Jude Invitational)

 ZEN DISC GOLF PODCAST EPISODE 23

Subscribe on iTunes | Listen on StitcherDownload Podcast Audio

Episode #23 – HOW WE WILL GROW THE SPORT (W/ JOHN HEATON – EVENT CHAIR ST. JUDE INVITATIONAL)

 

DISCS & ZEN

HOW WE WILL GROW THE SPORT

Today I would like to talk to you about how we are going to grow the sport of Disc Golf. But first I want to talk to you about something I call investments in the spirit. I first mentioned this term investments in the spirit in my book Zen and the Art of Disc Golf. And I identified this concept is any activity that you do that only require small amounts of your time or resources in which you give to others and eventually will come back to you in much larger amounts then you initially gave.
I want you to picture yourself as a vessel that holds all the good things that want out of life. This vessel grows as you receive more and more of the good stuff. I’m talking about love, affection, friendship, wisdom, but also success and money as well.  There is room for all of this good stuff in your vessel. Until it gets full.

JOHN HEATON

John is a player, an inventor and innovator, an entrepreneur, and a DG philanthropist who has a DEDICATION to growing our wonderful sport.

John’s bio:

I grew up in a small town in Northern IL; Seneca.

I’ve been a Frisbee fanatic since the 5th grade; freestyle and then some ultimate in college.

In 1984, right out of college, I moved to Kansas City.  I played serious club ultimate for years, which was on and off throughout my disc golf career.

In the summer of 1987 I was told of a “disc golf course” in town.  I went there (Swope Park) and was immediately hooked.

I went on to become the PDGA Rookie of the Year in 1988.

I’ve played in hundreds of tournaments. No 1st in majors but some good finishes.

25 years in medical / surgical device & equipment sales, marketing & product development.

I’ve traveled a lot for work, which has allowed me to play well over 600 courses.

I am now trying to use my product development experience to create some helpful devices for disc golf.

Founded Whirld Sports LLC in 2010

Scepter Disc Golf Caddie™

Scabbard

NexTEE™

As for the St. Jude effort … I had read some time ago, a bit of history on the PGA and how involvement with charity was one of the things that were attributed to the explosive growth experienced in the PGA Tour from the 70’s through the 90’s.  That stuck with me.  Then in 2012, Dana Vicich went to PDGA worlds and used his disc golf as a means to raise money for the American Cancer Society.  Both his aunt and mother had gone through battles with cancer.

His raising nearly $5000 was the trigger for me to realize that our sport could become a powerhouse for charity and that just as it help the PGA, it could significantly impact the growth and trajectory of disc golf.   Dana and I did a lot of scheming and plotting as to how we might make something significant happen.  We didn’t really get much more than a plan developed but then I received a call from a long time friend, Crazy John Brooks.  He mentioned that the wife of a friend of his was now working with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and had contact him to discuss how disc golf might become involved in helping St. Jude.  As it turns out, Brian Graham, at the PDGA, had just been given the green light by the PDGA Board to seek out a national charity partner that the PDGA could support.   It was all a bit of divine providence, if you ask me.  Well, long story short, things came together very quickly.   Annabelle Udo-O’Malley at St. Jude, Dana Vicich, Crazy John, Brian Graham, and I, along with others, put together the plan that lead to the Inaugural St. Jude Disc Golf Charity Invitational.  The epic location of Bayonet Golf Course was chosen and the rest is history.

All in all, it amounted to about 200 disc golfers becoming actively involved in fundraising.  Through their efforts, we raised over $225,000.  My sincere belief is that if we got more disc golfers involved in this effort we could raise millions of dollars.  If we did that, disc golf would be on the evening news, ESPN, Good Morning America, The Today Show, etc, etc.  The story of disc golfers raising money to help kids faced with cancer and other life-threatening diseases, is so compelling, the news would reverberate like nothing disc golf has ever done before.

All we need to do is to get more disc golfers involved in the fund raising effort.

 

Making the Whirld Better,

John Heaton
Event Chair
St. Jude Disc Golf Charity Invitational

Chief Executive Officer
Whirld Sports LLC
john@whirldsports.com
(PDGA # 4409)

 

Try the Scepter use discount code: MBD10 on WhirldSports.com

PRODUCT REVIEWS

CHRIS –

TIM –

PAT – Bug Spray.

JOIN MIND BODY DISC IN DONATING TO  ST. JUDE!

events.stjude.org/mindbodydisc

Every little bit counts, please give what you can. Together we can make a difference.

Remember, kids are the future of our sport. And for many kids, St. Jude is the key to their future.

How your donation helps:

  • Thanks to donors like you, no family ever pays St. Jude for anything.
  • St. Jude will continue to improve the treatment of childhood cancer and other deadly diseases through its groundbreaking research.

SIGNED BOOK GIVEWAWAY

Every podcast we give away a signed book to a random person who left a 5 STAR review on Amazon! 

on March 22, 2016
Changed my whole game and even my mood at work. Amazing book read then reread.

 

HELP US KEEP GOING AND GROWING!

Funny thing about podcasting… Success costs money. As we continue to reach record numbers of listeners the costs rise with syndication, web development, and GIVEAWAYS, I am constantly plagued with the question, how can I keep the podcast self-sustaining.

The answer: $1. That’s it.

If you love the ZEN DISC GOLF PODCAST, please consider donating as little as $1 a month and help keep this show alive, going and growing.

BUT WAIT THERE’S MORE!

Once we receive 50 supporters monthly, by supporting, you will be entered to win a $20 gift card from Infinite Discs. You will get one entry per donated dollar per month (i.e. Putter level =1 entry per month, Distance driver level = 3 entries per month). Cancel anytime!

Unknown$1 per month – Putter Level Unknown $2 per month – Mid-range LevelUnknown $3 per month – Distance Driver Level

DISCS & ZEN – HOW WE ARE GOING TO GROW THE SPORT OF DISC GOLF

Today, I would like to talk to you about how we are going to grow the sport of Disc Golf, but first I want to talk to you about something I call “investments in the spirit.” I first mentioned this term “investments in the spirit” in my book Zen and the Art of Disc Golf and I identified this concept as any activity that you do that only requires small amounts of your time or resources in which you give to others and that will eventually come back to you with much higher returns than you initially gave.

I want you to picture yourself as a vessel that holds all the good things that want out of life. This vessel grows as you receive more and more of the good stuff. I’m talking about love, affection, friendship, wisdom, but also success and money as well. There is room for all of this good stuff in your vessel. Until it gets full.

Now, what I want you to understand about this vessel is that it can always grow to allow for more of the good stuff. There really is no limit to how much it can grow, but at a certain point of filling this vessel, it’s growth begins to stagnate. It begins to slow down and stops letting more good stuff in.

The good news is there is a secret to get you through that stagnation so that your vessel can continue to grow to get what you want out of life. This secret may sound a little counterintuitive but hear me out. You have to let some of that good stuff out.

That’s right, you have got to make a little space in that vessel to let the universe know that you are ready to be refilled again and to grow some more. You have got to give away some of that good stuff and have faith that it not only will be returned but it will be returned more abundantly.

So if you want more love, you’re going to have to be more loving. If you want more affection you’re going to have to be more affectionate. If you want more friends, you will need to be a better friend. If you want more wisdom, you’re gonna have to share your wisdom. If you want more success you’re going to have to help other people find their success. And if you want more money (which all of us really do), you’re going to have to let some money go to a cause of your choosing with unrelenting faith that it’s going to come back to you.

It’s no secret that we (zendiscgolf) gives a lot of things away through social media, through this podcast, through our blogs and I am often asked how I can afford to give so many things away. The answer is simple: for everything I give away I get back at least tenfold from you guys – my listeners, readers, and followers, therefore my small investment reaps much higher rewards than its initial dollar value.

But let me explain this to you: Your return on investment is not going to come immediately. Sometimes it takes time. Sometimes we’ve been taking for so long that we have to let a lot out of our vessels before we can start receiving again. But when you start getting it back, it will be no mystery as to why it has come back into your life.

This law of giving, (and it is a law) works every time, but unfortunately as we get so wrapped up
in our own lives, it becomes very easy to get into the habit of taking more than we give.

As our vessel becomes full, it won’t allow anymore good stuff to get in. In fact with a lack of gratitude and appreciation for what we have, the vessel begins to shrink and actually pushes some good stuff out and we become self destructive. We spend more than we make, we go into debt, taking more than we give. We eat more calories than we burn, we get fat, taking more than we give. We expect more out of others without giving them more of ourselves, we cause our own suffering, taking more than we give.

Now don’t misunderstand me, you don’t need to empty your vessel in order to get more out of life. In other words, you don’t have to donate all of your money or all of your time to expect better out of life. It actually takes very little giving to get the process going and it’s not all about money as I mentioned above.

As a matter of fact the easiest way for you to give is to use the talents that you have and make the world a better place.

There is an old Zen proverb that tells of a student going to his master and asking him “How we bring about world peace?” Unexpectedly, the Zen master simply says “sweep the floor.” You see, it’s not always the big things we do that make huge differences. It’s the little things that we can do every day that make our lives better and other people’s lives better as well that multiply and make the world a better place.

So how does this relate to Disc Golf?

We often talk about growing the sport and the reason we want to do this is because Disc Golf gives so much to us. It is fun, peaceful, meditative, we enjoy the competition, and it comes very often with little to no cost to play. It gives us so much and yet expects so little.

If you truly want to grow the sport of Disc Golf you’re going to have to give something to grow Disc Golf.

When we talk about giving something to grow disc golf we were aren’t just talking about money. You can just as easily grow the sport using any talent that you have.

– Donate your time to other people, teaching them how to play.
– If you’re talented and working with children, develop a program to get children involved in Disc Golf.
– Sacrifice some of your game time to collect trash on the course.
– If you’re a writer, start a blog, write a book, even if you don’t have any Web development abilities, write to any of the bloggers on this cast we can all use additional writer on our blogs.
– If you are good at landscaping, volunteer to assist with course maintenance.
– If you are good at organizing, organize a team for your college or school, organize a club for your locality
– If you are good at photography, show the world the beauty that you see on the disc off course. (don’t forget to post and #zendiscgolf)

Your options are limitless. We all have talents that if used with the right amount of focus we will not only grow the sport and make the world a better place.

And that’s another tool for your Disc Golf bag.

Patrick McCormick

This blog originally appeared in ZDGP EP23.